Advances in Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

Bruce McGibbon, MD, radiation oncologist 

Advances in treating lung cancer with radiation therapy offer hope to patients with early stages of the disease and those in which the cancer has spread from the lungs to other parts of the body.

“The use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is one of the most exciting developments in radiation therapy in the last 15 years,” said Bruce McGibbon, MD, medical director of Radiation Oncology at the Smilow Cancer Hospital Care Center in Greenwich, and an assistant professor of therapeutic radiology at the Yale School of Medicine.

SBRT delivers a higher dose of radiation with fewer side effects for a shorter period of time (three to five treatments over one to two weeks) than traditional radiation therapy (daily treatments for six to seven weeks). Research suggests SBRT can be as effective as surgery among patients with early stage lung cancer. “We’re seeing excellent results,” Dr. McGibbon noted. Radiation therapy may also play a role in patients with metastatic cancer who are managing the disease well with chemotherapy.

In some metastatic cases, administering a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy can produce the “abscopal effect” in which untreated tumors shrink at the same time as those that were targeted with radiation. “This unique combination of treatments offers benefits you don’t get with surgery alone,” said Dr. McGibbon.

Advances in Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

Monday, November 11 | noon - 1:30 pm
Noble Conference Center

Speaker: Bruce McGibbon, MD, medical director of Radiation Oncology

Learn about the various advances in radiation therapy to treat patients with lung cancer, including those with early stages of the disease and those in which the cancer has metastasized or spread to other parts of the body.

To register, call 888-305-9253 or visit greenwichhospital.org/events. Free.